AMCC Blog

We’ve Been Making Waves for 24 Years

Date Posted: December 13, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog AMCC in the News

In 1992, with support from the Alaska Conservation Foundation, Nevette Bowen, a community organizer and fisherman, traveled coastal Alaska to listen to the marine conservation concerns of commercial, recreational, and subsistence harvesters, and coastal residents. A consensus emerged from these coastal voices and with it, the creation of the Alaska Marine Conservation Council (AMCC). In 1994, AMCC was founded as a voice for long-term, community based marine conservation. Since that time, AMCC has remained steadfast in its commitment to ensuring the role of local coastal residents in decision-making processes, and addressing growing threats to Alaska’s marine ecosystems, including high levels of bycatch, destructive fishing practices, and offshore drilling with insufficient consideration of fisheries resources and habitats. The work of AMCC is guided by the core principle that people are part of, and depend on, healthy and diverse marine ecosystems and are responsible for maintaining these ecosystems.

Excerpt from “Making Waves for 24 Years – The Alaska Marine Conservation Council” by Theresa Peterson, ONCORHYNCHUSXXXVIII, 1-2; 5-6.



#GivingTuesday is a great time to show AMCC some love!

Date Posted: November 26, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog Uncategorized

There are so many great causes to support on Giving Tuesday–we hope that AMCC is on your list!

Founded by the team in the Belfer Center for Innovation & Social Impact, #GivingTuesday is a global giving movement that has been built by individuals, families, organizations, businesses and communities in all 50 states and in countries around the world. This year, #GivingTuesday falls on November 27. This day is meant to inspire people to take collective action to improve their communities, give back in better, smarter ways to the charities and causes they believe in, and help create a better world. #GivingTuesday demonstrates how every act of generosity counts, and that they mean even more when we give together.

Thank you for your support!



AMCC Welcomes New Fishing Community Organizer

Date Posted: November 26, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog Uncategorized

Jamie O'ConnorHave you met Jamie O’Connor yet? AMCC is so happy to welcome her! She hit the ground running and is already in the swing of things.

Fishermen, pilots, and a noisy librarian raised Jamie in Dillingham, Alaska just north of the family set-net operation, where they’ve harvested salmon for six generations. She earned her B.A. of Journalism and Public Communication at the University of Alaska Anchorage, gathering diverse experience in corporate communications, independent film, and community theater projects. She then served Alaskans in Washington D.C., building Senator Dan Sullivan’s front office and internship program before running back to Bristol Bay with the sockeye. Jamie has since put down roots in Homer, where she participated in AMCC’s first class of Young Fishing Fellows. She joined the AMCC staff in October of 2018. She coordinates the Alaska Fisherman’s Network and supports our fisheries conservation projects. While fish consume the majority of her life, Jamie is also a certified yoga instructor, writer, and traveler. Her favorite thing in our wild world is to make connections — to nature, and to people. And she is excited to continue that work with AMCC.



Kodiak Ocean Boogie 2018

Date Posted: October 16, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog AMCC e-news       Tags: Ocean boogie

AMCC is pleased to announce the 11th annual Kodiak Ocean Boogie on Saturday, November 10th at Tony’s Bar! Enjoy live music, dancing, free appetizers, and an all around good time. Bid to win silent auction items and fantastic auctioned desserts, with all proceeds to benefit AMCC. We will not be doing a raffle this year. Please join us at the Boogie for a night of fun.

Buy tickets in advance or at the door. Thank you for your support!

Kodiak Ocean Boogie details



National Award Won for Research Project Examining Fisheries Access

Date Posted: October 10, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog AMCC e-news       Tags: Graying of the Fleet Research Project

Left to right: Courtney Carothers, Rachel Donkersloot and Danielle Ringer

“Graying of the Fleet in Alaska’s Fisheries: Defining the Problem and Assessing Solutions”

The Graying of the Fleet research project won a national award at Sea Grant Week hosted in Portland, Oregon last month. The Sea Grant AssociationsResearch to Application Award recognizes notable Sea Grant funded research that elevates public understanding and responsible use of the nation’s ocean, coastal or Great Lakes resources.

The Graying of the Fleet study examines barriers to entry into Alaska commercial fisheries in Bristol Bay and Kodiak Archipelago fishing communities. The research team consists of UAF faculty, Courtney Carothers, AMCC’s Working Waterfronts Director, Rachel Donkersloot, retired Alaska Sea Grant director, Paula Cullenberg, and UAF graduate research assistants, Danielle Ringer and Jesse Coleman. UAF undergraduate student, Alexandra Bateman, also contributed to the study.  Alaska Sea Grant and the North Pacific Research Board provided funding for the project.

The three-year study includes a global review of potential policy responses to the graying of the fleet in Alaska in the report: “Turning the Tide: How can Alaska address the ‘graying of the fleet’ and loss of rural fisheries access?” The research team also recently released two journal articles. Another article is currently under development.

“We’re honored that our work has received this recognition,” said AMCC staffer Donkersloot. “From the outset we have worked to meaningfully share project findings with a broad audience. Our team gave more than 60 presentations over the course of this project in local, state, federal and international venues. Last summer we worked with long-time fishermen and industry experts to gather advice that we shared via Public Service Announcements during the fishing season. We are hopeful that our work will continue to inform fisheries policy and better support the next generation of Alaska fishermen.”

Left to right: Jesse Coleman, Danielle Ringer and Rachel Donkersloot

The team has also created seven short videos featuring advice to new and young fishermen that are available on the project’s website and the Alaska Young Fishermen’s Network website. The final report is available at the North Pacific Research Board’s project database. Other project materials and reports are available at fishermen.alaska.edu.



Copper River Coho Salmon Available from Catch 49

Date Posted: September 28, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog AMCC e-news       Tags: catch 49

Copper River Coho Salmon Filet

AMCC’s Catch 49 Program is offering Copper River coho salmon in 10-lb, 20-lb or 30-lb shares, with ordering available online on Catch 49’s website until close of day on September 30, 2018.

  • Wild Copper River Coho (silver) Salmon
  • 8-12 oz portions
  • Skin on, pin bone in, vacuum-sealed and flash-frozen
  • Carefully caught and impeccably handled
  • Processed by fishermen-owned 60 North Seafoods
  • Available in 10-, 20-, and 30lb shares
  • Caught by Hayley Hoover of the F/V Obsidian and Tyee Lohse of the F/V Free Ride

Copper River coho, also known as silver salmon, are widely known as the finest coho anywhere in the world due to their high oil content and firm, robust flesh. Averaging about 12 pounds each, Copper River cohos arrive in late August and September, and signal the close of Alaska’s fresh summer season. Kodiak jig rockfish, wild Alaska sablefish (black cod), and Norton Sound red king crab are also available.

Catch 49 offerings are only available in limited quantities for a limited time. If you are not on our e-mailing list and would like to join it so you can be notified about Catch 49 offerings, please email katy@akmarine.org and ask to be added to the list. Please visit www.catch49.org to see current offerings.



Catch 49 Offers Bristol Bay Sockeye Salmon

Date Posted: July 11, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog AMCC in the News

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Catch 49 is for Alaskans, by Alaskans

Alaska seafood is the No. 1 brand featured on all US menus. But the majority of it is exported around the world, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). That’s what makes Catch 49 unique. Originally called “Catch of the Season,” this community supported fishery program provides Alaskans with wild seafood harvested by Alaska’s small-boat fishermen. Catch 49 is one of many initiatives run by the Alaska Marine Conservation Council (AMCC), who is committed to supporting local, Alaska resident fishermen and processors, and facilitating access to local, sustainable seafood to fellow Alaskans who share AMCC’s vision for maintaining a healthy marine ecosystem. The Catch 49 program is currently offering Bristol Bay sockeye salmon. Catch 49 allows customers in the state to order a share of the season’s harvest from small-boat Alaska fishermen ahead of time. Customers then can pick up their orders at a designated site in Anchorage, Fairbanks or Homer, about two weeks after the ordering period closes. “Although the program is quite consumer focused, we have had a high level of interest from foodservice operators in Alaska,” says Cassandra Squibb, who is helping to market Catch 49 products. “Not only does each offering come with information about the fishery, but we also can provide the name of the captain, the vessel, and exactly where the fish was caught.” Go to www.catch49.org to order 10, 20 or 45 lb shares of high quality, flash frozen Bristol Bay sockeye fillets.



June 2018 Post-Council Update

Date Posted: June 25, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council met in Kodiak June 4-11. Council meetings in fishing communities provide valuable engagement opportunities for both community residents and Council members. Representatives from Alaska Marine Conservation Council attended all meetings, and have developed discussion highlights:

Tanner Crab
Upon review of a discussion paper examining federal groundfish effort and observer coverage in areas associated with longstanding Tanner crab abundance on the east side of Kodiak Island, the Council voted to take no further action at this time. The areas identified remain a high priority to Kodiak Tanner crab fishermen to better understand the contribution to the Tanner crab stocks in critical crab habitat. Kodiak fishermen were interested in pursuing increased observer coverage in these areas. In 2010 the Council voted to require 100% observer coverage on non-pelagic trawl vessels and 30% observer coverage on pot cod vessels in order to fish in identified statistical areas until the restructured observer program was implemented.

The new observer coverage went into effect in 2013, prior to implementing increased coverage, and thus the increased coverage action was never implemented. Improvements to the observer program have been identified as a high priority and an action to focus coverage in particular areas at this time may hinder a more inclusive approach.

Community Engagement
The Council established an ad hoc Community Engagement Committee and will solicit nominations for this committee. The Council adopted a charter that aims to increase participation in the Council process by tribes and rural communities.

The membership of the committee will benefit from rural and tribal representatives and people with necessary expertise in the Council process to accomplish the committee’s goals. The community engagement committee will not replace the Council’s existing community outreach efforts which have very instrumental in the decision-making process but will seek measures to improve communication and understanding between rural communities, tribes and the Council.

Social Science Planning Team
The newly formed Social Science Planning Team (SSPT) met for its first meeting May 8 and 9 and began with reiterating the mission of the group, which is to improve the quality and application of social science data that informs management decision-making and program evaluation. The SSPT will identify data needs, make recommendations regarding research priorities, and advise analysts in efforts to improve analytical frameworks when possible. The SSPT will support the collection and aggregation of social science data in a manner that cuts across Fishery Management Plans and specific management programs within the North Pacific region.

During its two full days of meeting, the SSPT discussed numerous topics including subsistence data, use of existing data in policy analysis, economic data collection of North Pacific fisheries, incorporating qualitative information, moving toward co-production of knowledge and expanding stakeholder engagement. In addition to the current membership of the SSPT the Council recommended that membership expand to include a seat or two to include individuals with expertise in local and traditional knowledge. A call for nominations will be initiated with the intent of further appointments made in October.

Staff Tasking
During the final day of the meeting in Kodiak the Council responded to public comments in regards to the access challenges into the IFQ halibut/sablefish program and requested that staff develop a discussion to review existing programs that facilitate access opportunities for rural communities and new entrants within limited access fisheries.

The Council requested that the discussion paper include an evaluation of Norway’s Recruitment Quota as a program example along with other global initiatives to provide access that were highlighted in a presentation on the Turning the Tide report earlier in the meeting. The report addresses the growing problem of fisheries’ access in Alaska and provides potential solutions to barriers to entry. The Council requested that the discussion paper consider the efficacy of these programs, including successes and failures in providing fisheries access, the potential functionality of programs within the North Pacific management framework and how these programs may comply with standards under the Magnuson- Stevens Act.

The Council heard from a number of young Kodiak fishermen who own boats, hire crew, seek additional employment to make ends meet, but don’t see a path into the IFQ fishery due primarily to the high cost and risk associated with financing quota.



Council Meeting, Kodiak | June 4-11

Date Posted: May 31, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog AMCC e-news

Dear AMCC Community,

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council will be holding its next meeting in Kodiak, June 4-11. These annual meetings in rural communities are valuable engagement for both community residents and Council members. There are numerous occasions to engage in the policy arena during the meeting and evening workshops. The following events offer a venue to share our island stories and the value of the fisheries resource to our island communities.

Fishing Families Workshop – Monday, June 4, 5:15-7:15 p.m., Kodiak Convention Center
Hosted by the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. Discussion focusing on interactions of fishing families and changing regulations, environments, and socioeconomic conditions in Alaska’s fisheries and fishing communities.

Informal Charter Meeting – Monday, June 4, 7-9 p.m., Fishermen’s Hall
Hosted by Andy Mezirow of the NPFMC, Kurt Iverson with the Regional National Marine Fisheries Service Recreational Sector, and Tyler Polum ADF&G sport fish area biologist. Status update on charter-related issues in the NPFMC process, expectations for charter halibut harvest over the next few years, process overview for charter halibut recommendations each fall, and discussion on Kodiak Charter operators future engagement. Potential discussion on Halibut Charter annual reporting requirements for CQE’s.

IFQ Outreach Session – Tuesday, June 5, 5-6:30 p.m., Kodiak Convention Center
Hosted by The Council
Public outreach session with open forum for stakeholders to give insight on the present state of the halibut and sablefish IFQ Program and provide direction for future actions that might be considered by the Council and its IFQ Committee. The Council is particularly seeking input on issues related to entry-level opportunities and rural participation in the fishery.

Community Reception – Wednesday, June 6, 6 p.m., Afognak Native Corporation Building on Near Island
Open to the public. Enjoy local seafood and commemorate Chairman Hull’s last meeting on the Council.

The Council meeting begins June 6 and the Council will convene for the entire meeting at the Kodiak Convention Center downtown. The meeting starts at 8 a.m. and runs until 5 p.m. each day.

Council Meeting Agenda Highlights

Turning of the Tide report presentation by Dr. Courtney Carothers and AMCC’s Dr. Rachel Donkersloot – Wednesday, June 6
The report is a review of programs and policies to address access challenges in Alaska fisheries.

Tanner Crab, Gulf of Alaska groundfish effort and observe data – Sunday, June 10
The Council will be reviewing a discussion paper in regards to federal groundfish fishing effort and observer coverage in important Tanner crab habitat areas previously identified by a local knowledge mapping project on the east side of Kodiak Island. A segment of the identified areas was approved for 100 percent observer coverage in 2010 for a period of time before the implementation of the restructured program. The action was never implemented due to timing issues. The Council will consider potential next steps.

Community Engagement – Monday, June 11
The Council will have a discussion considering the formation of a community engagement and outreach committee structured to foster two-way dialog with rural communities and Native communities.

The full agenda can be found here.



AMCC Welcomes New Executive Director Jason Dinneen

Date Posted: April 30, 2018       Categories: AMCC Blog AMCC in the News

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We’re pleased to welcome Jason Dinneen as AMCC’s new Executive Director! A lifelong Alaskan, Jason has had the good fortune of working in communities across the state. Jason spent college summers set netting in Cook Inlet, stick picking along the Beaufort Sea coast, and working on the Exxon Valdez oil spill. These early work experiences gave him a great appreciation for Alaska’s oceans and the value they bring to the Alaska culture and economy. With over 20 years of nonprofit leadership experience in Alaska, Jason has directed a variety of organizations including the Alaska Small Business Development Center as well as overseeing the marketing efforts for Allen Marine’s boat building, tourism and retail operations. He is excited about AMCC’s mission and how he can help AMCC thrive in its next chapter!



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